Why Punk Rock?

Bulletin BoardIn my previous post, I mentioned that teaching is one the most punk rock things I could do; but why punk rock? Why as a point of reference and self identification should I choose such a penetrating and specific label to connect my love of teaching to community?

The punk rock I am talking about is not concerned with image and ought tos. We are not talking about the Sex Pistols or the Clash. We are talking about the sustained attitude of the DIY (do it yourself) ethos of American punk rock and hardcore over the last 40 years. The punk rock I was exposed to in Virginia Beach, Richmond, Washington D.C., and Atlanta was grounded in a political awareness of the times (80’s & 90’s), the possibility of authentic sustainable community, and a determination to break new ground.

Yes, many of us grew up and we have different views about the world, the role of government, community, leadership, economics, and education but this vital energy, this spirit of change and can do, affected many of us before we entered institution and career and we would do well to remember how much we wanted to help the world!

I see punk rock intersecting education in the following ways:

  • Teaching and embracing a DIY ethos, a self responsibility for learning and creating. As Mike watt would say Jam Econo!
  • Resisting the increasing commercialization of the field of education and the false analogy of education to business and its subsequent organizational models.
  • Connecting the politicians and policy makers to the classroom and putting positive pressure on them to make compassionate and innovate decisions that are well informed from a broad base of constituents and are unique and appropriate for their situations.
  • Creating radical and vibrant educational spaces that encourage joy, creativity, and innovation.
  • Resisting the over quantification of education and the boxing in of teachers with subjective metrics.
  • Organizing, communicating, and connecting with one another so that we may be stronger together than we are on our own!

Together we can create positive change and the time is now to reclaim our schools. I believe the solutions are really in each of us, especially the teachers, the majority of whom are beyond dedicated and have been in the trenches long enough to know what is needed.

It is important to note that I do not want our conversations here to be just about punk rock (or for myself to be only defined as punk) but rather we can use the shared cultural wisdom of the ethos of punk rock to re-energize and revitalize the discussion of education in our country and particularly what to do about it.

We have a responsibility to redirect the educational conversation in our country back to what is going right and how we can make improvements rather than to echo the constant critique of media, corporate interests, and the mandates of the state. We all come from many backgrounds, cultures, and have different points of view but by embracing one another and working together we can make a difference!

Let me know what you all think and chime in!

Until next time,

Erik

 

In doing research for this blog I got wonderfully distracted by the following:

Our Band Could Be Your Life: Scenes from the American Indie Underground, 1981-1991

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Band_Could_Be_Your_Life

Our Band Could Be Your Life is a well written look at influential bands from ‘80’s and ‘90’s. Anyone growing up then and listening to the bands in this book would probably enjoy it.

Edupunk as coined by Jim Groom. The term itself is debatable, as Groom will admit, but the concept around it is spot on. While primarily a higher education movement, many of the points raised by Groom and his peers are applicable to those of us in K-12 education.

Here is a good conversation between Jim Groom and Gardner Campell and the idea of a bill of rights (for teachers!) has been on my mind a lot.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MU1AOhdlyBM

Jim Groom talking about what is Punk Rock – Open ed – to open resources for the world on the web not as a repository or closed space http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7MxVqe_uRI

Jim Groom”s keynote for open ed conference 2011 http://chronicle.com/article/Jim-Groom/130917/

Steve Wheeler  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_9aTjYOTfdY

I also found this link showing open ed resources: http://atlas.edupunksguide.org/

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